Road to Peenemünde – AAR.

A week ago Monday the usual gang (Evan, Chris, Brian and myself) got together to play another NUTS! game.

I chose the ‘Road to Peenemünde’ game from the War Without End supplement as I wanted to get a handle on the ATGM rules, the game features an X7, as I was working on my modern vehicle stats at the time. Also I’ve got a fair bit of 1946 style what if? kit that hadn’t had an outing in ages. I won’t list the full briefing as it is in the book but basically it was a squad of Germans plus an X7 ATGM with a Maus against a platoon of Soviet infantry, a platoon of T34/85s, a single BA64 and an IS2.

My interpretation of the table- as seen from the German end.

My interpretation of the table- as seen from the German end.

Table size was the usual 6 by 4 foot. The House is by Hovels, Watch tower is a Fujimi plastic, Checkpoint by Grand Manner, One bunker was scratch built and the smaller on is a SOGGY special. The Maus is a Dragon kit.

The defending German squad.

The defending German squad.

The German infantry figures are from the TDQ range of alternate WW2 figures. The helmet they are wearing is more or less the same model that was adopted by the East German’s NVA after the war. It was issued in small number to Volksturm units in 1945. Looks like I need to tidy up the edge of that base too.

The world's first ATGM- the X7.

The world’s first ATGM- the X7.

The X7 missle, carriage and crew all come from FAA.

A half team of the infantry deploy in the woods.

A half team of the infantry deploy in the woods.

As does the X7.

As does the X7.

The game started with Chris’ Soviet infantry advancing up their left flank making best use of the cover available and trying to avoid the line of fire of the 2 MG42s.

Soviet infantry using a house to block MG fire.

Soviet infantry using a house to block MG fire.

Meanwhile the armour moved across the more open right flank using speed to try and close the range (not that the Maus was vulnerable from the front but Brian was hoping for flank or rear shot.

Pic showing off the 2 bunkers.

Pic showing off the 2 bunkers.

The Ba64 shot forward trying to draw out the fire of my defending infantry. Given it’s diminutive size Evan, controlling the Maus, ignored it…

Flying up the road it goes....

Flying up the road it goes….

The game basically came down to whether Evan and I could take out the Soviet tanks before they could get on top of us. Given their speed and small table we both had to make every shot count. Accordingly I let off an X7 missile.

Flying toward the T34/85, which spotted the missile and tried some evasive maneuvers.

Flying toward the T34/85, which spotted the missile and tried some evasive maneuvers.

Sadly I missed completely and got High Ex’d in return with predictable results.

Accurately placed HE can have deadly effects.

Accurately placed HE can have deadly effects.

Fortunately the Maus was doing much better, the IS2 was hit (good), but was over penetrated (bad) but then failed to pas a clank test and withdrew off the board (good). 2 more T34/85s fell to the massive 128mm gun but not before they had taken out my infantry to the immediate left of the Maus.

Given the activation die didn’t help the Russians, they failed to activate for 2 turns, their remaining T34/85 kept rolling forward.

3 tanks down so far,  the Maus is doing well.

3 tanks down so far, the Maus is doing well.

However Evan couldn’t seem to take it out. To make matters worse my Panzerfaust wasn’t in a position to help either. So the T34 trundled on and quickly got to the a position behind the Maus.

From this angle the 85mm gun can penetrate the Maus quite easily.

From this angle the 85mm gun can penetrate the Maus quite easily.

One lucky die roll later the game was over. With the Maus destroyed and a platoon of infantry about to over run, Evan and I conceded. The Maus was too slow to reverse and re position itself to keep the T34 in it’s front arc. I mentioned I’d much rather have 4 Hetzers with a total tonnage of a third of the Maus, rather than the single super heavy. Everyone agreed and it pretty much proved the pointlessness of the design. Unless you have an engagement range only usually found on the steppe or in the desert the power of the 128mm is totally wasted as you can easily be out maneuvered.

However the ATGM rules worked well and I’m looking forward to using them in some sort of counter factual WW3 game soon.

cheers,

Pete.

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8 comments on “Road to Peenemünde – AAR.

  1. Good fun game. The russian plan was just to try and get behind the Maus, which worked 🙂 Im just glad that once your moving even if you dont activate the tank carrys on, things could have been rather messy otherwise.

  2. Ken says:

    It looks good. That the great thing about NUTS! You can never count on the gods of war not getting you!

  3. Great report Pete. My favourite picture is the x7 missile flying across the table, very clever. I couldn’t tell if one of the crewmen was holding another X7 round or if he was reading the instructions – I could see it either way.
    Your game also points up the foolishness, as you say, of the Maus design. Ridiculous to put all those design and resource eggs into one big basket.
    Cheers,
    Mike

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thanks Mike.

      The flying X7 makes for a great marker doesn’t it?

      Both the Maus and the E100 were silly, though that doesn’t stop me putting them in a game. Next time I can see a night raid by Soviet sappers, swarming all over them with satchel charges….

      Cheers,

      Pete.

  4. tankguy1 says:

    Armour 460 mm (18 in) (in the area of the mantlet)
    250 mm (9.8 in) (mantlet)
    240 mm (9.4 in) (turret front)[1]
    220 mm (8.7 in) (turret side and rear, and hull front)
    210 mm (8.3 in) (turret front behind the mantlet)
    200 mm (7.9 in) (hull front)[1] 190 mm (7.5 in) (hull side and rear)

    stats from WHIKIPEDIA. Not sure what good it was to get behind the Maus except the Maus’ gun may not have been facing that way. The MAUS basically has a minimum of 200mm all around. NUTS has no stats so assume you did your own? Front turret and mantlet get the +1 for thicker armor but the rear armor and side armor are the same, and both 200mm. That would be about the same as the frontal armor on a Tiger II/Jagdtiger. Maus’ great weakness is of course its weight and size. Can’t use bridges. Bogs down. Takes days to fix a broken track. Hard to hide although you might be able to make it look like a barn. Unreliable – engine overheating problem. Can’t be recovered because the recovery vehicles can’t move it. Range of action poor and it uses a LOT of gas. Not to mention its speed isn’t that great. A movable fortress.

  5. Pete S/ SP says:

    Hi Mike,

    The scenario and all stats came from my mates copy of War Without End. In it the Maus has 16/12/4 armour. Given that the T34/85s APR is listed as 7 and rear armour is half side it has a small chance of penetrating. It worked in the game as it was the only way the Maus could be defeated but I’ll put my hands up and admit that I took the stats on faith and didn’t check them.

    Totally right about it’s size and weight, the river crossing technique is equally mind boggling.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

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