From the Shed: German Tobruk Bunker

Using a free sample stl file from Digital Taxidermy I’ve knocked out this little bunker.

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Based on a spare CD I’ve built up the sides with scraps of foam and sculptamold. Then followed with my usual basing techniques, textured, paint, static grass then finally tufts. I’m really pleased with how it turned out and will pick up more of the files in due course.

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Although none of my Grandparent’s generation are alive at the moment and none of them were Normandy veterans (variously Far East, India, North Africa then Italy and Arnhem) I can’t help but think of them all today, the 76th anniversary of D Day, they were the greatest generation. My affinity with the campaign is perhaps strengthened by the road trip I took there with my father a few years back.

Cheers,

 

Pete.

 

32 comments on “From the Shed: German Tobruk Bunker

  1. Jeff Groves says:

    I like what you’ve done with the terrain, it really enhances the bunker. Is there a version mounting one of the salvaged French tank turrets?

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thanks Jeff- not that I can remember- would be easy to just plant a turret on this though. Digital Taxidermy’s range is very tempting though.

      Cheers,

      Pete.

  2. The removable top is handy! I thought it might just be a painted doorway from the first pic.

  3. Nicely done Pete and like you I have nothing but admiration for the D-Day generation.

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thank you. I only wish I was able to learn more about my own family’s involvement.

      Cheers,

      Pete.

      • There are professional researchers out there and they aren’t necessarily expensive, they do it for tue love of history. Something to consider one day perhaps.

      • Pete S/ SP says:

        Yeah that is a good idea thanks. I know through some work my Uncle has done that my maternal great great Uncle was at Passchendaele, being injured but surving the war. That is about all I know of him. Need to chat to him properly when I see him next.

        Cheers,

        Pete.

  4. Wudugast says:

    Looks good – simple but effective 🙂

  5. Chris Kemp says:

    Nice piece, Pete.

    Regards, Chris.

  6. As soon as I saw this post come up in my feed it reminded me of when you went on the trip with your Dad but you beat me to saying it hehe. Great job mate. 76 years, wow. I’m not sure if you get Amazon Prime in the UK but there are soooooo many great WW2 docos on their that you’d enjoy. They range from very well put together mini series to just small, amateurish, ones but they’re all pretty good.

  7. Nice work Pete. Very effective use of flocking, and nice painting too.

    As I think you remember, I am a military veteran of the US Army. I made it a point over my life to make sure that I spoke with my fellow veterans both in my family and outside of it. My grandfather was a tank driver in World War II, and I am the only one who has his memories now.

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thanks Mark.

      I remember you saying you were a combat Engineer. Am glad that your Grandfathers memories are still preserved, it is important such things are. Am glad I got what I did about my Grandfathers. It is a shame about my wider family I didn’t know so well.

      Cheers,

      Pete.

  8. Hi Pete Looks Outstanding:) So was that printed by you? Great model:)

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thanks Dave. Yeah- I’ve printed the basic structure then built up the ground around it. I’ve plans to do a full complex next so will take some in progress pics for that too.

      Cheers,

      Pete.

  9. Azazel says:

    Looks nice, and I agree with Jeff, mark and others that your basing has really elevated it as a piece.

    • Pete S/ SP says:

      Thank you. It was a really enjoyable piece to do and the good thing is I can just print out more too.

      Cheers,

      Pete.

      • Azazel says:

        Probably I don’t have a 3d printer. When you say things like that… 😀

      • Pete S/ SP says:

        They are getting very affordable these days….

        Cheers,

        Pete.

      • Azazel says:

        I could afford one. The main issue is just user-friendliness/ease of use. My understanding is that it’s essentially a hobby of it’s own with the tinkering and the slicing and all that, and so it’s the time investment and needing to learn new systems. Computers don’t scare me – one of my roles is managing IT in my workplace, but I see it as like learning the rules to a new RPG or a more complex board game.. I just can’t be bothered when what I want is just to be able to plug and play in my time off.
        Having said that.. if I can get my work to buy one and train me, then it’ll definitely be on the cards… 😀

      • Pete S/ SP says:

        To be honest the entry level ones are nearly ar the plug and play level. From opening the box to starting the test print- including assembly and calibration took me no more than 90 mins. I can get a file ready to print in the slicing software in about 5 mins max- and that is acomplicated multi part effort. It does take some trial and effort to know what settings are best for what model but that learning curve is fairly gentle. No idea on how to actually design a model though….

        That said if you can get work to teach you even better.

        Cheers,

        Pete.

      • Azazel says:

        I’d probably want something pretty good quality, so from my occasional browsing it looks like I’d be wanting to start with a resin printer, or a higher-end SLA model. Measure twice, cut once!

      • Pete S/ SP says:

        That is fair enough. I don’t have space outside in my shed for a resin printer so the idea of the smelly resin in my small house isn’t appealling… that said I could just stop being lazy and tidy the shed….

        Cheers,

        Pete.

      • Azazel says:

        Hm.. how smelly are they? I guess I could make some room on the single desk in the shed, though that’s where my light box lives – but there is also a ton of other junk there…

      • Pete S/ SP says:

        No idea I just know that they are- resin is usually.

        Cheers,

        Pete.

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