From the Shed: Scatter Terrain.

I’ve used my 3D printer to run off some useful modern bits of scatter terrain. Not the most exciting bits, definately not in colour terms, but they should be good for set dressing on the table. All of them were printed from free stl files from either Wargaming3D or thingiverse.

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First up we have a set of 6 sewer entrances. As I’ve already got a sewer system, the resin one from Ainsty, these should prove very useful.

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Secondly I ran off a load of Jersey barriers. Great for modern games.

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Finally I did some anti- tank obstacles… well not quite. The eagle eye amongst you might recognise these as concrete beach anti- erosion defences. Whilst they have been popularised in the alt WW2 game DUST Tactics they have also been used in the real world too. The Ukrainians used them successfuly as road blocks to stop an armoured thrust towards Mariopol by Russian/ Sepratist forces.

Once lockdown is over I’ll be able to add these to some games.

Cheers,

 

Pete.

From the Shed: nuke marker and Pripyat sign.

I have managed to get some paint on the first bits of my 3D printed terrain and am really pleased with how it looks.

 

First up is the nuked city marker. Can see this getting some use in megagames as given half a chance most players in those games get rather homicidal if they have any nukes in their arsenals.

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I also pained up the famous Pripyat sign for some games of Zone Alfa, when the club reopens. A simple grey scheme and plenty of weathering seems to set the tone right for the game.

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Cheers,

 

Pete.

From the Shed: Contemporary Russians- same figures but two paint jobs.

In Elhiem Figures (ultra)modern* Russian ranges there are some very nice packs labelled Pro- Russian Militia/ Russian SOF that are great for representing those forces doing the Kermlin’s work in areas as diverse as the Donbass in the Ukraine** or Syria or even using them for modern what if? games. The interesting thing from a painters perspective is that as the Russians (or their proxies) use such a wide range of camouflage patterns see here you have a lot of choice.

russians in partisan camo

The first batch I painted in the ‘Paritsan’ pattern, oddly for a country that suffered so badly from the depradations of the Waffen SS in WW2, it is based the SS ‘Oak Leaf’ pattern but with a different palette of colours. A search of the web will show it being worn all over the place so these figures should be useful for militia in the Ukraine or Wagner PMCs in Syria.

winter modern sovs

The second batch have been painted in plain white and have appropriate winter basing to join my small, but growing, winter collection.

Cheers,

Pete.

* There seems to be a standardisation in table top wargaming to call anything post WW2 up to the turn of the millenium ‘moderns’ wheres as 2001 forwards is deemed ‘ultra- moderns’ both are a bit clumsy imo but it is what most people know so it is what I go with.

** It is with interest that I’ve spotted an upcoming Osprey book on the subject by Mark Galeotti.

Print and Play board game Tutorial.

I recently bought YAAH! magazine number 9 as I was interested in the game based around the battle of Donetsk Airport in 2014-15, rather than pay a lot to have the printed version shipped across the Atlantic I bought a PDF from Wargames Vault:

http://www.wargamevault.com/product/214499/Yaah-Magazine-and-Complete-Wargame-9?src=hottest

I thought I’d share a quick tutorial on how I made the game.

First things first is to print the relevant game components and counters, I think that YAAH! uses American rather than British paper sizes which makes things a little more complicated.. I don’t have an A3 printer so I tiled the game board across three sheets, likewise the counters were spread across two pages. I printed them out using the highest print settings on to matte photo paper.

Next I assembled what I needed:

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Scissors, metal ruler, cutting mat, glue- I used Fast Tack glue, I find it better than PVA for gluing paper as it is less runny, Craft knife- use a new blade; the usual caveats about sharp things apply, clear sticky backed plastic- very Blue Peter I know, and a seam roller – meant to press the seams of wall paper flat it is great for getting things properly stuck down, I used mount board from the local arts and crafts shop as a base for both the game board and the counters.

Firstly I tackled the game board:

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When I tiled the board for printing I allowed for an overlap, I then trimmed each page down for gluing onto the mount board. I decided to work from right to left overlapping as I went, so cut the print outs down accordingly.

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Squirt some glue on to the back of the first piece.

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Then spread it out into a thin layer to get a nice even coat of glue using an off-cut of cardboard.

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Then using the roller ensure that the whole piece is firmly stuck down.

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Repeat the procedure for the next, middle piece…

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… and also the final piece, get the pages lined up whilst the glue still allows you before pressing the page into place using the roller.

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The three pieces stuck down together.

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Carefully trim the excess off to leave the game board.

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Layout a section of the clear sticky backed plastic, sticky side up and the carefully place the trimmed game board face down on to it. Once again use the roller to ensure good adhesion.

Next I moved on to making the counters.

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One page was roughly trimmed, then glued and rolled as before on to the mount board.

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Then both sides of the counter sheets were carefully trimmed to the exact, same size before they were stuck together. Makes sure that the glue is spread everywhere on the counter sheets as they will be cut up into small sections, and blank un- glued patches will cause problems later on.

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Now you should be left with the two faces glued to either side of the mount board properly lined up.

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The final job is to cut out the counters, an sharp bladde is essential here to ensure a clean cut.

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The finished result, not bad for an hours work, with the thickness of the card and the sticky backed plastic the components are surprisingly durable.

Cheers,

 

Pete.