A new look at the Battle of Kursk.

A bit back Bill of Under Fire sent me this news article that he had found:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-48963295

I looked for the journal article that it mentioned, and at the time of writting, it is available for free here:

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16161262.2019.1606545 (just click on the PDF tab) which is always nice to see as so much academic work is hidden behind rather expensive paywalls most of the time.

It is definately worth taking the time to download and read if you have the slightest interest in the Eastern Front of WW2. I will flag up a few quick points though…

Although the Germans are now believed to have lost signaficantly less tanks than previously, although I don’t think the attritional strategy suggested by the author would have worked in the slightest: the economic output of the Germans was dwarfed by that of the allies. Even for the duration of the summer I don’t think it could have forestalled the Soviet offensive, leaving aside the human cost the Soviet materiel losses were replaceable.*

The battle was still an operational defeat (the salient was not reduced) and a strategic defeat as the Nazi forces never regained the initiative on the eastern front for the rest of the war.

For those of us who like to play wargaming campaigns with our tanks it does seem that retaining possession of the battlefield at the end of an encounter, thus allowing you to recover/repair as many tanks as possible, mitigates the majority of losses as relatively few tanks that are knocked out in combat are reduced to flaming wrecks. That is definately something to factor into future games.

The strength of the SS divisions vis a vie the Whermacht ones, far stronger, nearly twice as big in some cases. Whilst the early SS formations suffered from a paucity of equipment by this stage it seems clear that that trend had been reversed.

I hope you have found that of interest and if you read the articles and have any comments I’d love to hear them.

Cheers,

Pete.

* Some rough numbers to argue my case. The Panze IV, Sherman and T34 are roughly comparable. Between 1939-45 the Nazis made 9000 Pz IVs, between 1940- 45 about 50,000 T34s were made, in slightly less time (1942-45) about 50,000 Shermans were made.

Advertisements

From the shed: Old- School sci- fi figures.

Recently I treated myself to some figures from my favourite range of old figures: the 1990s vintage Copplestone designed ‘Future Skirmish’ now sold by Moonraker.Back in my teens they got used when I used to run RPG sessions of Cyberpunk 2020*; I always loved their ragged post Apocalypse look.

Here they are painted:

DSCN1852

DSCN1853

DSCN1855

The figure on the left is more modern: a Casting Room cultist with a weapon swap that I have done to use as a medic/ Rougue Doc (he is painted red and white with a Plague Doctor mask so works for me) in Necromunda.

I’ll add them into Necromunda as hired guns or use them in other Sci- Fi games that come along.

 

A nice trip down memory lane….

 

Cheers,

 

Pete.

* Which will return as a tabletop RPG to tie into the release of the Cyberpunk 2077 computer game.

Gaming… be careful who you tell….

 

I’ve just got back from a rather good day’s gaming in Sheffield (I’ll blog on the two games I played later on) but whilst I was there I was made aware of this video:

 

Scary stuff in a way and it is terrible that his family’s health has suffered too.

Nonetheless it gotr me thinking about how open people are about their hobby. I know that in recent years ‘geek culture’ for want on a better term has increased in prominance and exceptance but it is still not something that I readily volunteer that much… Through my misspent 20s I still gamed but I hardly told anyone; I figured that very few people I met through my DJ-ing and writing in the goth/ industrial/ experimental scene would care and anyway other things could be discussed. Now that I have stepped back from that and most of my social circle consists of gamers I am obviously far more open about it. It did get me wondering how everyone else felt about it?

I’d be interested to hear your views….

 

Cheers,

 

Pete.

 

From the Shed: Merkava IV

Apologies for the nearly month long silence… been busy irl- all of it good thankfully.

 

Anyway here is a little something I’ve finished a Hobby Boss IDF Merkava IV MBT to give me a pair in 1/72nd.

 

20190619_155541

As usual it was painted by brush in acylics them weathered with oil paint and pigment powders. I need to find a suitable figure to go in the commanders hatch that I left open.

 

Cheers,

 

Pete.

Progress Report- 2nd Quarter 2019.

In the past 3 months I have painted 305 6mm, 50 20mm and 3 28mm figures, finished 4 1/72nd kits, 58 1/300th vehicles and read 28 books.

Not a bad quarter all things considered- dropped a bit on books from last quarter so I need to re- double my efforts (partly due to a book I thought was poorly written but the information in it was good, I felt I should finish it but my enthusiasm wasn’t that high).

Cheers,

 

Pete.

From the Shed: A bit more terrain.

First up is the compound that I made with the parts from Maenoferren which he had 3D printed. I’m really pleased with how this one turned out. Should get lots of use from Colonial through to 21st century. A big thanks to him again.

DSCN1845

I also got some paint on the last bits of Ainsty Casting‘s Sewer section that I had sat about undercoated for at least a couple of years.

DSCN1857

DSCN1858

DSCN1860

It is a nice system don’t get me wrong but it has been a bit of a white elephant costs wise. Today, knowing what I now know I’d go for printed mats but there is still an tangible tactile fun manipulating the resin blocks, not dissimilar to Lego really.

 

For a couple of things I’ve done in the past with it see here and here.

 

Cheers,

 

Pete.

From the Shed: African Huts.

A fellow member of The Wargamers Forum had put up some pictures of the 1/72nd/ 20mm African themed terrain he was working on. Some of this scratchbuilt stuff he cast in resin for himself, I sent him a cheeky message seeing if he was willing to sell a few castings.

 

A week later, after money was sent via paypal, these arrived in the post:

20190607_165156

Here they are finished:

DSCN1847

DSCN1848

I gave them a very quick paint job, the cast texture really took to the sponge, wash and drybrush techniques I used. They shall be very useful for my long running Rhodesian Bush War games.

 

Cheers,

 

Pete.